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  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kohashi/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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Google wants to patent domain reseller registration widget

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 15:43

Patent application describes domain registration widget.

Not very novel. (Graphic from U.S. patent application 15/333565)

Google has filed an application (pdf) with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to patent a “Method and Device for Domain Web Page Registration”.

The application describes a need by third-party website builder services to offer domain name registration to people after they create a website. Of course, almost all website builders offer domain name registration through a reseller system.

I believe that the patent is related to a widget Google designed to sell domain names to Blogger users. The patent claims:

“According to some implementations, the list may include one or more available domain names having a top-level domain selected to be emphasized by the third-party website. For example, if the third-party website provides services for bloggers, the top-level domain “.blog” may be selected to be emphasized.”

If you create a blog on the Blogger platform now, you will get a pop-up dialog about registering a domain name:

Once you search for a domain you will see results in the same dialog box:

While creating a widget dialog like this is a different implementation of domain reselling systems, domain resellers might want to take note of some of the claims Google is making in the patent application.

The patent application was filed in 2016 and published today.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Original France.com owner sues to recover domain from the country

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 14:27

French courts nabs valuable domain name for its government.

France.com was used by a tour operator. Now the French government owns it. (Photo from Screenshots.com)

The original registrant of France.com back in 1994 has filed a lawsuit (pdf) to try to recover the domain name France.com, which the country managed to wrestle away through the French court system.

France.com, Inc. filed the suit in U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Virginia, where Verisign is located. It names The French Republic, a number of French government entities, the domain name, and Verisign as defendants.

The plaintiff has been using the domain name to promote tours in France. In 2015 the defendants tried to get control of the domain name through the French judicial system. In 2016 the Tribunal de Grand Instance de Paris ordered the domain transferred to the French government. The plaintiff appealed, and the appeals court affirmed the lower court decision.

The plaintiff says that the defendants lack authority to seize property in the United States (where France.com, Inc. is located) but they reached out to Web.com, the domain name registrar, and managed to get Web.com to transfer the domain name to the defendants in March.

Boom. The plaintiff’s business was sunk. The site now forwards to France.fr and obviously the plaintiff’s email addresses no longer work, too.

France.com, Inc. is suing on a number of grounds, including Reverse Domain Name Hijacking, expropriation, and more.

It’s interesting to note that the City of Paris, France, was ordered by a U.S. court to pay $100,000 for reverse domain name hijacking and tortious interference in a domain name dispute. Something tells me they haven’t paid.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

19 end user domain sales up to $55,000

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 13:47

Here are some of the domain names that end users bought at Sedo over the past week.

Sedo’s public sales over the past week were led by SysAdmin.com, which sold for $55,000 and now forwards to SysAdmin.ru.

Other sales include a brand name purchase by an anti-fatigue mat maker, a tech company that uses .cn getting the matching .com domain, and an app using .guru buying the matching .com.

Let’s get to the list, and you can see previous lists like this here.

SysAdmin.com $55,000 – The buyer is using Whois privacy but the domain now forwards to SysAdmin.ru, a site with technical content.

Coba.com $15,500 – Coba International makes anti-fatigue mats, entrance mats and floor safety markings.

Cordet.com €10,000 – Cordet is an investment firm that was using the domain name CordetCapital.com. The longer name now forwards to Cordet.com.

DDEV.com $10,000 – DDEV is a development technology.

Sentinel.co $8,888 – Sentinel Industries in Fiji.

CamCube.com $7,525 – CamCube is a dental product made by Witlaken.

Haylion.com $7,000 – Haylion, based in China, is a technology company that uses the domain name Haylion.cn.

PlateRate.com €6,800 – PlateRate is a food app that uses the domain name PlateRate.guru.

VideoMapping.com $6,500 – Mr. Beam is a projection art studio.

Caisson.com $5,500 – Caisson is a new company offering secure data and documentation services.

MyJackpot.co.uk €4,999 – Whow Games GmbH, a gaming company in Germany.

FundEye.com $4,700 – Carnegie Fund Services is a “legal representative of foreign collective investment schemes in Switzerland”.

SeedMarketing.com $4,000 – Student marketing company Seed Marketing shortened its domain name from SeedMarketingAgency.com.

SecureGas.com $3,900 – Red Clay is a technology consultant to the utility industry.

Laparisina.com $3,000 – Parasina is a Mexican fabrics company that uses the domain name laparisina.com.mx.

AIninja.com $3,000 – This was purchased by a company called AI Ninja that does AI work for the finance industry.

1property.com $2,900 – 1Let Limited is a UK property leasing company.

SunshineMobile.com £2,500 – Sunshine Mobile (USA) Ltd is a mobile communications company.

BitNine.com $2,500 – BitNine is a blockchain and cryptocurrency company.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. More end user domain name sales
Categories: Domains

Privacy advocates want Whois private by default. It shouldn’t be.

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 15:25

Like many other public databases, Whois serves a vital public interest. It shouldn’t be private by default.

It’s becoming increasingly clear that privacy advocates are using GDPR as an opportunity to demand privacy for all domain name registrants. They are successfully framing the discussion as privacy should be the expectation of everyone, and any exception to that requires scrutiny.

That’s a far cry from today’s status quo. No privacy is the default but privacy can be added.

Perhaps my view is colored by being a U.S. citizen, but I believe privacy advocates are going to far.

I have a reasonable expectation of privacy in my home. I don’t have one when I go out on the street. I also don’t automatically get privacy when I buy a home or car, start a business, or register a domain name.

Anyone in Austin can look up information about a homeowner’s property and its taxes through a centralized database. A record of my car purchase is available from the county or state. My name is attached to my business registrations. And for domains, there’s Whois.

Now, if I really want or need privacy, I can get it. But I have to put a little bit of effort into it. I can use a proxy for my transactions. A homebuyer can create a trust to buy a home or they can request their information be obscured in the county’s appraisal database. I can use a registered agent for my business. And I can use a Whois proxy service for my domain name.

The public is well served by making this information public. They can investigate who is behind a company. They can spot fraud or foreign governments spreading discontent. They can understand trends and find evidence of discrimination using public data.

Those people who need a little extra privacy can readily get it by essentially “opting out” of having their information public.

I’m fortunate to live in a country in which the government isn’t trying to silence bloggers (for the most part).

Anonymity can be a real problem for people in some parts of the world, and it’s an issue that domain name registrars have created a solution for: Whois proxy services, often called Whois privacy.

These services work really well and they can be added for free at many registrars. Registrars are good at pushing these services on registrants, too; GoDaddy adds them by default and asks people to opt out of using them.

Yes, you can interpret GDPR as meaning that Whois information should be private…for EU residents and citizens.

I also understand that the easiest approach for domain registrars is to use a blanket approach across all registrants.

But we should be careful about framing the discussion as privacy-first.

One of the areas this is coming up is with an accreditation system to give certain groups access to full Whois records. Privacy advocates are worried about people getting access to Whois records as these people chase down IP infringers, find phishers and, in my case, perform journalistic research.

Of course, GDPR will still apply to what people do with this data. I’m not going to take 20 unmasked Whois records of EU citizens and publish them. But there’s a real public interest in this data.

This is one of the reasons I believe there will still be a use for Whois proxy services in the age of GDPR. Even with an accredited access model, information will be seen by many groups…including government agencies.

If people truly need protection they can add a proxy service. At the same time, the public is served by making most of the information public.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Credit bureaus go after more AnnualCreditReport.com typosquatters

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 14:12

Company says that domains are typos of its AnnualCreditReport.com site.

Central Source, a company created by the three major U.S. consumer credit bureaus to AnnualCreditReport.com, has filed another lawsuit (pdf) against alleged typosquatting domain names.

The company has filed at least 10 cases in the past including one against 227 domain names.

The latest suit is against 15 domain names including annualcrediitreport(dot)com, wwwannualcreditreports(dot)com and httpannualcreditreport(dot)com.

Central Source says it has tried to identify the owners of the domain names but was thwarted by Whois privacy services and fake Whois information.

The in rem lawsuit was filed in Virginia, the home of .com registry Verisign. Many plaintiffs files in rem suits there to recover domain names.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Afilias plans to file IRP to halt .Web

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/24/2018 - 17:42

More slowdowns for .web domain name.

A lawyer for domain name registry Afilias says the company plans to file a Cooperative Engagement Process (CEP) and subsequent Independent Review Process (IRP) should ICANN move forward with delegating .Web to Nu Dot Co.

Nu Dot Co won the auction to operate .web for $135 million. It was bankrolled by Verisign (NASDAQ:VRSN), and Nu Dot Co had an agreement with Verisign to assign rights to the domain after it completed contracting.

Afilias was one of the companies that was upset; it was the runner-up in the auction.

Donuts pursued the matter as well. It was disappointed that Nu Dot Co forced an auction of last resort rather than a private auction in which Donuts would get to split the proceeds. After going through ICANN’s accountability processes it sued ICANN. A court tossed the case out because new TLD applicants agreed not to sue, but Donuts appealed.  The appeals court has yet to hand down its decision. Oral arguments will likely occur this fall.

Adding to the delays was the U.S. government, which launched an antitrust investigation into Verisign running what many people think is the best new top level domain. The government closed its investigation without taking action.

Afilias is asking ICANN to give it a 60 day “heads up” when it starts contracting with Nu Dot Co so that it can file for CEP.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Is .Com still king in China?

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/24/2018 - 16:40

Kassey Lee analyzes new data about domain name and website usage in China.

Is .com still king in China? How important is .cn? Is there any other extension worth watching in China? These are questions many domain investors may have in their minds. To answer these questions, I turn to the annual publication “China Statistical Report on Internet Development,” the latest of which was released last month.

The big picture first. China now has a whopping 772 million internet users but the figure represents only 56% of the entire Chinese population, indicating a lot of room for further growth. More internet users will drive more demand for products and services, which in turn will require more websites.

You can also look at it from the number of websites developed in China. The number has grown to 5.3 million but is still very small when compared with the approximately 90 million companies reported by the National Bureau of Statistics of China. This large gap may be due to companies not being online yet or running their business on ecommerce platforms such as JD.com. Eventually, these companies will want to move to their own website to gain complete control of their business. Therefore, we can expect real demand for domains to continue for a long time in China.

Now let’s look at the domain market. The chart below shows domains registered in China since 2005. The total number of domains as of December 2017 was 38 million.

You may notice that the market skyrocketed in 2007. This was caused by speculative demand for .cn domains encouraged by attractive registration fees as low as 30 cents per domain. However, the demand fell off when the Chinese government announced a new rule in 2009 requiring all domain owners to submit personal information and photo identification. This rule especially hurt investors outside China, and many simply let their domains drop. Domain registrar Godaddy even stopped .cn registration in 2010 and did not resume it until early 2016.

The market recovered in 2012 when real demand for .cn and .com propelled the growth. Then, 2015 and 2016 saw another speculative boom with rapid growth of 51% and 36% respectively thanks to new investment themes: Chip (Chinese premium) and long number domains. When speculation died down, however, many investors simply let their domains expire, causing the drop in 2017.

Now, let’s look at individual extensions. Starting 2013, the survey provides information about the following extensions.

Year20132014201520162017 cn1082948011089231163635942060149120845513 com63114807949939109979411434524311307915 net743996910031141500116330711288239 info6451547624261072243211170601 org164476232614397970330457253819 biz517428548370770210062154322 .中国 (China)2745532853953527854741151895745 Others369209139634644569421564201 Total1844061120600000310205144227570238480355

Obviously, .cn and .com are the major players with market shares of approximately 50% and 30% respectively. Both are considered mainstream extensions in China and have kept their strong position for more than 10 years. Therefore, they are the best candidates for investment, with .com being the king in terms of prices and .cn the queen in terms of quantity. In corporate China, .com is the first choice.

If you invest in .cn domains, be aware that single-dot (second level) .cn domains are the norm, accounting for 80% of all .cn domains. The biggest third level domain category .com.cn (two dots) has only 11%. The global trend, in my opinion, is one-dot domains because of simplicity and consistency for consumers.

.net has grown from a mere 0.2 million in 2005 to 1.3 million in 2017 (ignoring the speculative boom mentioned earlier). .info and .中国 (China) are worth watching as they both broke the 1 million registration mark in 2017. To a lesser extent, .biz has increased as well. For new extensions launched in the last few years, unfortunately, they are still buried under the “Others” category, suggesting that they are not significant enough to be worth separate listing.

The report also contains other information relevant to domain investment. One thing unique to China is that it skipped the PC era and jumped right into mobile phone age. As a result, 98% of the internet users access the internet from their mobile phones. Therefore, if you plan to sell domains to Chinese buyers, make sure your sales landing page is designed for mobile phones. Also, 92% of the internet users use a messaging app such as Wechat as their communication tool. These apps are actively used by Chinese 24/7, so they will enable you to get reply from Chinese buyers much faster than by email which is not that popular in China.

If you plan to sell domains to Chinese buyers, make sure your sales landing page is designed for mobile phonesClick To Tweet

In short, the future of the Chinese domain market is bright and continued growth can be expected. .com remains king as it is favored by corporate China and it commands the highest prices. .Cn is most popular in terms of numbers because of wider choices and lower prices than .com. Finally, the extensions to watch are .info and .中国 (China).

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

GoDaddy gets extensive aftermarket domain transfer patent

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/24/2018 - 15:10

GoDaddy (NYSE:GDDY) patent covers a number of methods for transfering domains as the result of an aftermarket sale.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted patent number 9,954,818 (pdf) which covers a number of aspects of selling an expired domain.

The patent is a continuation-in-part of many other patents and is titled “Domain name hi-jack prevention”. However, the claims are directly related to certain aspects of domain name aftermarket purchases.

These include the fast transfer system used by Afternic, which involves getting pre-authorization from a seller and its registrar to transfer a domain name in the event of a sale. It also lists methods of handling domain name escrow transfers as well as selling expired domains.

Sarah Ptalis (Sr. Director of Product Management), Paul Nicks (VP, Aftermarket) and Frank Taylor (Director of Premier Services) are listed as inventors.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Some panelists are afraid to find RDNH

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/24/2018 - 13:39

I can’t believe this panelist didn’t find RDNH.

A World Intellectual Property Organization panelist has found in favor of the owner of CAGI.com in a cybersquatting complaint but, for some mysterious reason, failed to find reverse domain name hijacking.

CSP International Fashion Group S.p.A., which owns CAGI.eu, filed the dispute against Capitol Appraisal Group.

Capitol Appraisal Group registered the domain name in 1995 and uses the domain for its business.

Here’s what panelist Dawn Osborne considered when finding that the case was not reverse domain name hijacking:

Nevertheless, a finding of reverse domain name hijacking involves some notion of wrongdoing or bad faith on the part of the Complainant. The panelist is not prepared to go this far as the extent of the Respondent’s rights and legitimate interests were not known to the Complainant who may have brought the Complaint in good faith. Therefore the Panel declines to make a finding of reverse domain name hijacking.

The extent of the respondent’s rights and legitimate interests were not known? OK, ask your child to take a look at the website at CAGI.com:

Ask them if it looks like a company is using the domain for its business.

The law firm representing the complainant, Rödl & Partner, was also not found guilty of reverse domain name hijacking in the recent case for MyBoutique.com.

They are losing cases but getting rather lucky on RDNH findings.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

Park.io starts drop catching .AI domains

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/23/2018 - 17:51

Service known for ccTLDs adds .ai domains.

Park.io has begun offering drop catching services for .AI domain names. .AI is the country code for Anguilla but has become popular for artificial intelligence companies.

Park.io is known for helping domain investors get popular country code domain names that are good for domain hacks or have taken on a meaning of their own, such as .io, .me and .ly.

The addition of .ai domains was made possible by the registry moving to EPP.

As with all domain names at Park.io, catch fees are $99 and include a year registration. If there’s more than one interested party there will be an auction.

One of the first featured .ai domains coming up is eat.ai.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

No related posts.

Categories: Domains

Meet Erik Bergman, who paid $900k for Great.com – DNW Podcast #182

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/23/2018 - 15:30

Erik Bergman has great plans for Great.com

Imagine this: you’re bidding in your first domain name auction. You’re traveling and are at a hotel in Iceland with poor internet connectivity. There’s a domain name you really want but the reserve is at least $1 million. Suddenly, your screen shows a $500,000 bid. You bid the next increment at $600,000. Within a matter of seconds it escalates and you place a $900,000 bid. Then, crickets. You have to wait to see if the seller accepts the bid because it’s below the reserve. They do!

That was Erik Bergman’s experience earlier this year when he bought Great.com for $900,000. Today, Erik gives a first hand account of buying the domain name. More importantly, he explains why he bought this great domain name…to do great things.

Also: GoDaddy expired domain change, .App’s early success and more.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play below or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains

A simple way to make GoDaddy Closeout auctions more fair

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/23/2018 - 13:02

A win-win for GoDaddy and most bidders.

A lot of people are frustrated with the bidding process at GoDaddy when it comes to closeout auctions.

The idea behind closeout auctions is smart. If no one bids at least $12 for a name during the regular GoDaddy expired domain auction, the domain goes to a Dutch auction where the price starts at $11 and decreases by a dollar a day until it hits $5.

Closeouts allow GoDaddy and its expired domain partners to get something for a domain even if it’s not worth the $12 starting bid price.

But how things work in reality is very different from how they work conceptually.

People don’t want to get into bidding wars in auctions. If no one else has bid on an expired domain as the clock winds down, they (or their computers) stand ready to ping GoDaddy the minute the domain goes into closeouts so they can get it for $11 rather than what is likely hundreds if they place a bid during the regular auction.

Think about what’s happening here. An auction will expire with no bids at even $12, but there are sometimes 5 or more ready buyers who would be willing to spend $100+ on the domain. The point of auctions is to sell things for the market price, but that’s no longer happening in these auctions.

That’s bad for people that don’t have automated means to snipe the closeouts. It’s also bad for GoDaddy and its partners because they are leaving money on the table.

The solution is fairly simple: raise the starting bid for closeout auctions.

Instead of setting a buy now price below $12, set it much higher. I’m not sure what the right number is. Maybe it starts at $75, drops to $50, then $25, then $10 and drops a few bucks after that. I know that I’d be willing to pay $75 or more for many domains that close with no bids.

Raising the price will have two effects.

First, people will be more willing to bid in the regular auctions rather than wait for closeouts. The potential savings of waiting won’t be as great.

Second, GoDaddy and its partners will make more money.

The only people who will lose out are those that have perfected their systems for sniping closeouts.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. Please, GoDaddy, don’t add watcher data to expired domains
Categories: Domains

GoDaddy is closing an expired domain “loophole”

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 04/20/2018 - 14:18

Last second backorders will no longer circumvent closeout process.

Auctions for expired domain names at GoDaddy can get competitive. With no backorders required, domain names can go from $0 to hundreds of dollars even when no bids are placed until the last few minutes.

This is complicated by the closeout process. If you bid on a domain in the live auction it will likely be bid up to over $100. If you can snag it when it goes into closeouts then it’s only $12 plus the renewal fee.

Unfortunately, there are lots of people with API access and computing power who treat the closeout like a drop. They start sending calls to buy the domain as soon as the regular auction closes.

But there has been a loophole that has helped people like me. If you place a backorder the second an auction closes, you can win the domain for the cost of a backorder before it gets placed in closeouts.

For the past year or so, I will closely watch auctions and be ready to bid if someone jumps in at the last minute. If the auction ends with no bids, I’ll place a backorder at the second the auction ends.

Historically, this has helped me scoop up a lot of domain names. About 95% of the domains that make it through the auction with no bids. But it’s gotten tougher this year.

Starting in January I noticed a lot of people placing backorders with a few minutes left in the auction. I’m not sure why they were doing this because it triggers a $10 bid and then everyone can pile in.

Then a few weeks ago I noticed that many of the domains I was backordering at the last second were getting scooped up by other people. My success rate went from 95% to about 25%. My guess is that they automated the process for backordering to get the timing just right.

While the backorder loophole was nice while it lasted, GoDaddy is about to eliminate it.

Joe Styler explained this change in a post on NamePros this week.

So now the options are either bid regularly and fight with everyone else, or program a system to snipe domains the minute they hit closeouts.

Well, it was fun while it lasted. At least now I won’t log into GoDaddy to place a backorder, only to be frustrated when someone places a last minute bid.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  3. EDR: Weird expired domain sales (partially) explained
Categories: Domains

.App domains are off to a strong start with brands

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 04/19/2018 - 13:48

Over 2,000 .app domains have been registered during sunrise.

If sunrise is any indication, Google’s .app domain name is going to shoot out of the gates.

Sunrise began March 29 and there are already 2,225 names in the zone file. During sunrise, only trademark holders that have registered their marks with the Trademark Clearinghouse can register domain names.

I suspect that companies realize this is one of the better top level domain names and are also concerned about phishing and fake apps that could be distributed at these domains.

Apple has been particularly active, registering 75 .app domain names by my count. Microsoft has 41 and Bank of America has 27 .app domains.

Following Sunrise, a dutch auction early access period will begin on May 1. General availability starts May 8.

While there is an opportunity for domain investors, many of the names have premium prices. About 2% of the hundreds of names I searched for did not have a premium.

Also, domain names must have an SSL certificate to resolve.

Google paid $25 million for the rights to run .app.

Full details about the launch are here.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. Google and Amazon.com backpedal on closed top level domain names
Categories: Domains

What domain names The Hill and others bought this week

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 04/18/2018 - 13:43

A cryptocurrency exchange, nightclub owner and the political site The Hill bought domain names.

I learn about a lot of interesting industries and topics when I review Sedo’s end user sales. For example, this week I learned about pentanomics, a new theory of government. I also learned about safety shoes.

Here are some of the end user domain name purchases completed at Sedo over the past week:

Allbit.com €7,900 – Allbit is a decentralized cryptocurrency exchange.

NightPay.com $7,500 – Rekom Group operates 77 bars, pubs and nightclubs across Denmark, Norway and Finland.

EthereumOdds.com $6,500 – The domain has Whois privacy and is forwarding to a sports betting site that lets users bet with bitcoin.

Usergate.com $5,000 – Entensys Corporation in Russia owns Usergate.ru.

HillTV.com $5,000 – The Hill, a political media company that runs TheHill.com.

SafetyShoes.com $5,000 – HKSDK is a company in Demark that sells “safety shoes” and work shoes.

Penta.org $5,000 – The Pentanomic Institute, which uses the domain Pentanomics.org. They are promoting a new theory of government called pentanomics.

ConcreteDynamics.com $3,000 – Summit Concrete is a concrete company in Kansas City.

MyBookkeeping.com $3,000 – Remote Books Online, a Quickbooks advisor and small business bookkeeping company.

TFPE.com €2,985 – The domain stands for The Funding Partners. It’s an agriculture blockchain company.

Diennea.net €2,500 – Diennea S.r.l. is a marketing company that uses Diennea.com for its website.

RAS.co.uk £2,250 – Retails & Asset Solutions in the UK bought its acronym.

You can see more lists like this here.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  2. What domain names Business Insider and 18 others bought last week
  3. What domain names Mozilla and others bought last week
Categories: Domains

A reminder for UDRP filers: Mess up? You can always apologize

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 15:27

If a complainant representative isn’t aware of all of the facts, it can always say mea culpa.

Cricket South Africa, an organization behind a professional cricket competition in South Africa in the T20 format, has been found to have engaged in reverse domain name hijacking.

It was a complex case in which the complainant’s attorney likely didn’t have all of the facts. The respondent called out the complainant with the real facts. When it did, rather than apologize, the complainant doubled down.

For that, it was found guilty of reverse domain name hijacking.

The timeline is long and it’s worth reviewing the entire decision. But I’ll summarize here:

1. The Complainant announced plans for its cricket competition.
2. Someone registered t20globalleague.com in response to the announcement.
3. Ortus Sport & Entertainment, acting on behalf of the Complainant, contracts with a third party service (the Respondent) to acquire the domain from the registrant.
4. The Respondent acquired the domain name and sent an invoice to Ortus to forward to the Complainant.
5. The league was delayed and the Respondent didn’t get paid. It never got paid and held on to the domain.
6. The Complainant filed a UDRP against the Respondent to get the domain name.

It’s highly likely that the attorney representing Cricket South Africa was not aware of this series of events. I think this is often the case in UDRPs, even ones that aren’t as complex as this one. In some cases, a company tries to acquire a domain name and then someone else at the company files a UDRP 5 years later.

This looks bad and is often grounds for reverse domain name hijacking. But complainants have an option at this point: presented with evidence by the respondent of its mistake, the complainant can always apologize and not pursue the case any further. Yet they end up either not responding to that information or doubling down.

In this case, the complainant doubled down. It complained of late submissions by the respondent rather than the obvious disparities in its case.

Panelist Tony Willoughby explained:

…when the Respondent was finally able to produce the Complainant’s email to Ortus Sport of September 21, 2017, demonstrating beyond doubt that at that date (nearly four months prior to the filing of the Complaint) the Complainant was indeed aware of that correspondence [ed: showing that Ortus contracted with the Respondent on the Complainant’s orders], the Complainant’s response (in the form of the Complainant’s response to Procedural Order No. 4) was to seek to keep it from the Panel, arguing on a formal technicality that the Panel should not look at it.

At no stage in the course of this proceeding has the Complainant offered any indication of remorse for its lamentable conduct.

Willoughby also explained why it’s not OK for a complainant’s representative to just claim ignorance to what really happened:

The Respondent sought a finding of RDNH in the Response based upon the Complainant’s failure to disclose in the Complaint the September/October correspondence set out in Section 4 above. The Complaint failed to mention that correspondence because the person responsible for drafting the Complaint was unaware of it. Is that good reason for declining to make a finding of RDNH? The Panel does not believe so. Abusive complainants could simply tailor their instructions to their representatives, omitting inconvenient facts [emphasis added]. The Panel believes that it is entitled to assume that before signing the certificate at the end of the Complaint and filing it with the Center, the Complainant’s representative sent the Complaint in draft to the Complainant and obtained the Complainant’s approval to its content, thereby assuming responsibility for its accuracy.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. Telepathy scores $40,000 from reverse domain name hijacking case
Categories: Domains

WIPO panel explains a common expired domain occurrence

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 13:31

A company wanted a domain but failed it capture it when it expired. Then it filed a UDRP against the new domain owner.

A World Intellectual Property Organization panel has provided an unusually descriptive explanation and interpretation of a very common occurrence.

Rolyn Companies Inc. filed a UDRP against the domain name Rolyn.com just weeks after the domain name was sold in an expired domain name auction. The domain was previously used by another company named Rolyn. That another company previously used the domain for its business suggests that the complainant is unlikely to have exclusive rights in that term.

Take a look at how the panel summarized this while inferring that if the complainant wanted the domain, it should have figured out how to buy it upon expiration:

What happened, in the Panel’s overview, is that the Complainant, which owned 8 domain names incorporating the trademark ROLYN, sufficiently desired the disputed domain name in the “.com” gTLD that it offered initially USD 3,000 and eventually USD 10,000 for it. In the circumstances, the Complainant may reasonably be presumed to have been aware that another owner had used the disputed domain name for a long time, in fact for 22 years. It is not for the Panel to comment on how the Complainant runs its business or on the various steps that might have been taken through an agency or by itself to become notified of the impending availability of a desired domain name, e.g., by placing it on permanent “backorder” with domain name auctioneers. Only the Complainant knows why the disputed domain name apparently slipped through its fingers when it came up for recycling, particularly since the Complainant was trying to buy it from the Respondent within only 6 weeks after the auction. It had been bought openly by the highest bidder, by or on behalf of the Respondent. To a degree, the release of an expired domain name carries at least some implication that it is no longer wanted by its presumably unchallenged previous owner and invites the inference by a potential buyer that no other party felt any special entitlement to it. Had the Respondent done a search it may have found, as shown above, the existence of potential buyers of which the Complainant was merely one, and there is the further possibility that a new entity might build its name around an available domain name, rather than vice versa.

I wonder if the part “To a degree, the release of an expired domain name carries at least some implication that it is no longer wanted by its presumably unchallenged previous owner” will come in handy for another common type of case: a company forgets to renew a domain and then files a UDRP against its new owner.

This particular panel went the extra mile an on examining how common the term Rolyn is and how exclusive the complainant’s rights in the term might be.

Kudos to panelists Dr. Clive N.A. Trotman, The Hon Neil Brown Q.C. and Jonathan Agmon.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. Non-Profit Urban Logic Guilty of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking
Categories: Domains

U.S. government asks ICANN to investigate GoDaddy’s Whois policy

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 20:59

U.S. gov weighs in on GoDaddy’s Whois policy.

The U.S. government has sent a letter to ICANN asking it to review GoDaddy’s (NYSE: GDDY) activities around blocking access to Whois records.

David Redl, who heads the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, sent the letter to ICANN’s board today asking it to look into the matter.

At issue is GoDaddy’s decision to block access to Whois records through Port 43. A lot of security and brand users use Port 43 to track bad guys, but a lot of spammers use it to harvest Whois records and barrage domain registrants with unwanted emails, texts and phone calls.

Redl writes:

First, the actions taken by GoDaddy last month to throttle Port 43 access and to mask the infonnation in certain WHOIS fields are of grave concern for NTIA given the U.S. Government’s interest in maintaining a WHOIS service that is quickly accessible for legitimate purposes. NTIA is concerned that GoDaddy’s approach of throttling access and masking infonnation will be replicated by other registrars and registries, compounding the problems these actions create.

While NTIA is sympathetic to the need to protect customers from bad actors and malicious activity, we think that the actions taken by Go Daddy are inconsistent with the
multistakeholder approach ofICANN and potentially conflict with ICANN’s Registrar Accreditation Agreement. 1 NTIA encourages you to investigate the actions of Go Daddy as a contractual compliance matter, but also consider an ICANN cross-community discussion on the issue. Such conversation could result in a solution that addresses GoDaddy concerns, while still meeting the needs of the legitimate users of Port 43.

The timing of the letter is peculiar. Although ICANN is under pressure over GoDaddy’s blocking, it’s kind of pointless in light of the possibility that all of Whois will go dark next month as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation goes into effect. I find it odd that the letter avoids the elephant in the room.

The letter also asks ICANN to consider if companies other than the registrar should be able to make DNS changes at the registry:

With the growing sophistication of domain names registrants and third party content delivery networks seeking to offer enhanced security features, including deploying DNSSEC, NTIA sees merit in examining the roles other parties could play. One example is the feasibility and impact of allowing non-ICANN accredited registrars to offer services that manage specific DNS resource records, such as MX or NS records, directly with a registry.

I wonder who made that ask?

Update: James Bladel, GoDaddy VP of Policy, released this statement to DNW:

ICANN’s Registrar Accreditation Agreement (RAA) requires GoDaddy to collect contact information for every domain name, and to publish this in a WHOIS database that is public and can be accessed anonymously. The RAA (Sec. 3.3.5) also requires us to protect registrant data from harvesting for the purposes of spam and abuse. Our goal is to reconcile this conflict between our obligation to operate a Port43 WHOIS service, and our duty to protect our customer data from harvesting by bad actors.

We have irrefutable evidence that abuse of WHOIS data is occurring, even by “whitelisted” Port43 users, and we will do everything in our power to protect our customers. We have therefore taken steps to guard against bulk harvesting on Port43, while still making the required data available via protected web-based queries.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  3. Here’s what happened to ICANN on Capitol Hill yesterday
Categories: Domains

Why Mike Kugler spent $500k on Vacation.Rentals – DNW Podcast #181

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 15:30

Mike Kugler’s company VacaRent paid a record amount for a new TLD. Find out why.

Mike Kugler is CEO of VacaRent, a company that just paid a record price for a domain under a new top level domain: $500,300 for vacation.rentals. On today’s show, Kugler gives the interesting story about how he negotiated for the domain and why he was willing to pay so much. There are lessons in his story for both how domains are sold to end users and the power of syndicated domain listings. Also: Emailed offers, FURY, and ICANN.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play below or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  3. The challenges of new TLDs with Tobias Sattler – DNW Podcast #177
Categories: Domains

Napoleon.com hit with UDRP. Owners fight back with lawsuit

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 14:20

Domain owners fight back in court before UDRP is decided.

Last Month Wolf Steel, which markets fireplaces under the brand name Napoleon, filed a UDRP cybersquatting dispute against the domain name napoleon.com. The owners of the domain name are fighting back with a lawsuit.

Emmet Stephenson, Tony Stephenson and Domain.com, Inc. (not affiliated with the Endurance International Group domain name registrar) filed the suit (pdf) in Washington State on April 12.

The lawsuit states that the Stephensons registered the domain name in 1995. Since that time they have received multiple offers on the domain name, including from Wolf Steel, but have declined the offers.

Emmet Stephenson grew up in Louisiana and has long been infatuated with Napoleon Bonaparte, the lawsuit states. The Stephensons own Napoleonic artifacts such as Napoleon Bonaparte’s death mask, a plan of the Battle for Austerlitz, one of four unique clocks commissioned by Napoleon Bonaparte for his children, and various documents signed by, written by, and written to Napoleon Bonaparte.

The domain name has been parked and showed ads for fireplaces and barbeque grills, which is likely the basis for Wolf Steel’s UDRP.

Nevertheless, it seems unlikely that the Stephensons registered the domain name in bad faith to target the fireplace maker.

The Stephensons company owns a number of great domain names including Communications.com, Wireless.com, Annuities.com, Bookie.com, TX.com, Technology.com, Hut.com, and Police.com.

Attorney Derek Newman is representing the Stephensons.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: Domains
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